FabXLive

July 25, 2020

Last week we had the opportunity to share some of the ideas behind Open Know-How on the FabXLive conference. Open Know-How is a metadata standard envisioned by Andrew Lamb from Massive Small Manufacturing, and developed by a neat group of open hardware enthusiasts.

From the session’s description:

The COVID-19 pandemic was addressed by a surge of open source projects made by makers around the world. As a result of these decentralized and hasty efforts, users have been overwhelmed by a variety of redundant ideas, as well as a lack of complete and standardized documentation. This will be mainly a documentation workshop on which we will explore the Open Know-How Standard.

During the workshop we will learn how to make OKH Manifest files and use it to document and evaluate medical designs for COVID-19 around the web. We will use this information to learn how to effectively discover, compare and select the best projects from a list of devices. As a final activity, we want to discuss the possibility to apply Open Know-How for a wider variety of applications in the maker community.

Check the workshop documentation here.

Conversatorio MADIS Udenar

March 27, 2020

A raíz de la colaboración latinoamericana ante la pandemia del Covid-19, me invitaron a participar de este conversatorio organizado desde Nariño, Colombia, con un enfoque en el diseño y fabricación digital. Mi participación fue corta y me enfoqué a proponer el trabajo de los makers en temas relacionados al diseño centrado en el usuario durante la pandemia.

Vídeo

Open hardware from Academia

February 15, 2020

During the first week of February, a group of researchers and users of open hardware in academic contexts gathered in Bath to discuss topics that relate to hardware development, documentation, licensing and the involvement of academia with the open source community in general.

Please check the notes of our sessions at the OHAC2020 Gitlab Repository.

Card Catalog by Glyn Lowe on Flickr - https://www.flickr.com/photos/glynlowe/8495349616/

Towards an Ontology of the Open

March 17, 2019

One idea has been forming in my mind over the past year, as a combination of different experiences that I’ve seen over different communities dedicated to open content, and how the same problem of documentation affects all communities alike.

  1. The first one is Creative Commons. One thing that I noticed was how useful the use of metadata was to gather and classify information through one of the biggest content “donors“, The Met. Creative Commons has this great wealth of information, searchable not only because 375,000 are available, but because there is existent metadata to do so. When you consider open works in the wild, the use of metadata is dependant of the platform on which it is uploaded, which means that works in data silos are more likely to contain metadata. One idea that came up during an interview with Creative Commons was related to how we transport data from one medium to another. If I go to a rural area to create art with children, can I think of making a metadata card that can be easily translated into the language of digital?
  2. Open hardware was my second entry point, due to the difficulty of determining what an open hardware project is. Compared to a book, a piece of hardware is comprised of different things: hardware, software, documentation and sometimes outside tools; therefore, it is more than the sum of its parts. But it doesn’t really sum because its elements are somewhat dislocated, although in principle, they interact with each other through the element’s interaction with the physical world. So the question remains: how can we define a particular element of open hardware? The OSHWA Certification is doing a great job in determining whether a particular group of elements constitute open hardware. The question that arises is whether metadata can help classify open hardware works in a way that it can even be useful for patent examiners to review prior art from open works, even those who are not part of a repository. That would mean that works can be decentralized and at the same time indexable, just like web pages.
  3. Finally, a solution comes from how some software and data projects on the web have come to use data schemas to make their content structured, easy to classify and standardized on the web. There are different types of schemas and taxonomies, as many as types of data that can be found.

It really makes sense that if libraries, museums and software have a standardized set of metadata tags that can be used to classify and organize creations, open works should follow suit. The question is: how and when will this happen?

Miami Maker Faire Group Picture

Maker Faire Miami

April 18, 2017

Thanks to MANO Americas, the University of Miami School of Architecture and Dade College, last week I had the chance to visit Dade College to showcase open projects from Latin America at the Miami Maker Faire. Projects from all over Miami presented, as well as others hailing from Colombia, Perú, Argentina and Costa Rica, among other countries.

This also marks the first international showcase on behalf of OSHWA El Salvador and other communities in the region that are creating hardware to share.

Ponencia sobre Open Source Hardware en la Universidad de El Salvador

January 3, 2012

Tuve el gusto de ser invitado a dar una ponencia sobre sistemas de patentes y diseño Open Source presentado en el primer Congreso Nacional de Estudiantes de Ingeniería Industrial, Universidad de El Salvador 2011.

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